CULTURE BRANDS UNIVERSITIES UNITED NATIONS
HOME SUBSCRIBE ABOUT US CONTACT US


Global Goals

Press Freedom Day

UNESCO CREATIVE CITIES NETWORK

UNESCO EDUCATION




« Louis Vuitton Spring Summer 2009 Fashion Show at Closing of Paris Fashion Week | Main | Public Transit Usage is Rising in America »

October 7, 2008

Reader's Digest Conducts Global Presidential Poll


Presidential Poll

According to the results of a first-ever global presidential poll conducted by Reader's Digest magazine and published in the November issue (on newsstands October 21), Barack Obama is the world's preferred choice for president of the United States by far.

(Reader's Digest magazine is published in 21 languages and reaches 70 million readers worldwide. It is part of The Reader's Digest Association, Inc., a global multi-brand media and marketing company headquartered in Pleasantville, New York, USA.)

The poll, part of the cover story "How the World Sees Us" by Reader's Digest Washington Bureau Chief Carl Cannon, asked 17,000 people in 17 countries, including the United States, whom they would like to see in the White House, and to weigh in on the global issues they most care about. They were also asked to characterize how America is perceived abroad.

"For the first time, Reader's Digest used its unique international footprint to provide a tapestry of global perspectives on several of the most important issues of our time, leading with the election of the next American president," said Peggy Northrop, U.S. Editor-in-Chief, Reader's Digest.


Golden Gate Bridge


Regarding the question of which candidate they would vote for if they could, respondents voted overwhelmingly for Obama in every country polled, with the exception of the United States, where Republican John McCain was preferred over Democrat Obama by a narrow margin.

"It's Obama by a landslide -- except in the country in which he's actually running for president," said John Fredricks, Director of Polling for Reader's Digest. "What is most striking is the margin of his support."

In the Netherlands, Obama-mania surpassed 90 percent. In Germany, it was at 85 percent--numbers not usually seen in political polling. Similar results held true on all six continents that the magazine polled.

One of the questions was "When you think of the U.S. government, do you consider yourself pro-American, neutral or anti-American?" The poll also asked respondents to rank eight issues in importance: terrorism, the war in Iraq, the global economy, global poverty, human rights, the environment, international trade, and nuclear proliferation.


New York


Key Snapshots:

• Americans ranked the global economy as most important; terrorism, second; and the war in Iraq, third. Only the Russians were more concerned with terrorism than Americans.

• In seven nations (Australia, Brazil, Canada, Finland, Germany, Great Britain and Taiwan), the environment came out on top as a major concern.

• Respondents in Canada, Germany, Netherlands, Finland, Australia, and South Africa reported paying the most attention to the U.S. election. Respondents in Brazil, Poland, Russia, India, and Taiwan reported paying the least attention.

• While preference for the candidates is nearly equal in the U.S., support for Obama is significantly stronger in all other nations.

• In the U.S., McCain is seen as more qualified to address issues related to war and security, while Obama is the stronger candidate for humanitarian issues, such as poverty, the environment and human rights.

• Globally, the most important issues are the economy, poverty, and the environment.

• The election of Obama would be more likely to improve the image of the U.S.

• Most countries polled have a neutral opinion of the U.S. government. India is the most pro-American government (31%) while Spain, Netherlands, Indonesia and Canada have the highest percent (21%, 21%, 20%, 19%) of respondents who are anti-American government.

• The majority in India (73%), South Africa (65%), the Netherlands (55%) and France (52%) would be interested in moving to the U.S. while about 70% of respondents in Poland, Russia, Indonesia, and Australia expressed a lack of interest in moving to the U.S.

• South Africa is the only country where the election of McCain would have a slightly more positive impact on the image of the U.S.


Source: Reader's Digest


Quote

"Well, also, was it written by Theologians: a King rules by divine right. He carries in him an authority from God, or man will never give it him. Can I choose my own King? I can choose my own King Popinjay, and play what farce or tragedy I may with him: but he who is to be my Ruler, whose will is to be higher than my will, was chosen for me in Heaven."

- Thomas Carlyle, Sartor Resartus


|GlobalGiants.com|


del.icio.us StumbleUpon reddit Facebook Google Plus Tweet This Seed This on Newsvine

Edited & Posted by Surender Hastir | 7:32 AM | Link to this Post


Follow GlobalGiants.Com on Twitter

Start from HOME Go to Top


TRANS WORLD EXPORTS


  DMCA.com Protection Status